Tag: sportsmanship

Faith and Gaming: The Best

Many years ago I was at summer camp; it was a rather unusual summer camp. It was run by the United Presbyterian Church on the Lebanon, New Jersey, campgrounds of the American Baptist Convention, and it was for high school aged students who loved to perform music, giving them the opportunity to work under the baton of one of the best conductors alive—who happened to be Jewish. We learned to sing and play some of the greatest music ever written, by Bach and Handel, Mozart and Mendelssohn. Oh, we did the Bible things, too, and the summer camp things, but ultimately this was music camp, and we did music.

One of those who was primarily responsible for running the camp was a Presbyterian minister generally known as Pastor Tom. I remember him sharing informally one day with a few of us. There are many ways to glorify God, he said. The way we’re doing that here is by producing the best music we are able to produce. I came to realize that he was right, that God was truly glorified by the music we sang, because we all did our best and created something wonderful.

I’ve come to realize over time that this same concept, of doing things as well as we can to glorify God, applies to much more than music. Read more

Faith and Gaming: Preliminaries

The following article was originally published in April 2001 on the Christian Gamers Guild’s website. The entire series remains available at its original URL.

In 1978 I had the benefit of receiving a bachelors degree from Gordon College in Wenham, Massachusetts. I arrived there in 1975, brought with me an associates degree from a small Lutheran Bible college, and studied many subjects in a new but ancient light. Gordon was a member of The Christian College Consortium, a confederation of Christian undergraduate and graduate schools who were serious about both Christianity and education. In those days at Gordon there was a lot of emphasis on an idea incorporated in this phrase: the integration of faith and learning.

What this meant was that being Christian was a total commitment, a complete identity of person with something which, although much more, was at least in part a philosophy, a set of ideas and ideals, a world view which should permeate our approach to every part of life. We were to learn in a way that reflected our faith; and we understood things from the perspective of our faith. Read more