Tag: education

Roll for Teaching 2: Goals

Hi class! Good to see you all again. It’s been a while and much has changed. Some bad, like the tenacity of the COVID pandemic, some good, like finally being married to my very real dream of a wife! Last time we met was a bit of an introduction and an incomplete list of games that suit playing with kids. Today is time for a more theoretical approach, so let’s all grab a piece of paper and make sure your #2 pencils are sharp!

Goals. Purpose. Aim.

Imagine that I just wrote these out on a blackboard for you while saying them aloud. I might even underline them. Today’s topic is why we are playing the game. Why are we playing the game in class? Why are we playing the game with your kids at home? The game should be a means, not an end, when teaching. So what is the end?

If the game is a reward for good work, then this is not really important, but if the game is used to teach something, then we need to keep that in mind. I’m going to go out on a limb here and assume that teaching in the USA, or wherever you live and teach, at least resembles teaching over here in Belgium. I’m going to assume that you have something that resembles lesson plans, goals that need to be met in the year, or trimester, or other time period. For my lessons, I’ve got five periods in a school year and a list of goals for each period that my inspections expect me to accomplish, or at least to work towards. Read more

RPG-ology #20: Pay Attention

This is RPG-ology #20:  Pay Attention, for July 2019.


When Multiverser was first going to publication, artist Jim Denaxas suggested that from henceforth everything in my life had become tax deductible.

My job today is to create worlds, and to find ways to import worlds to games—my games and the games of referees around the world.  Whatever I do in pursuit of that job is a business expense.

If I go to see a movie, I’m researching plots, stories, and sometimes fantasy or science fiction settings.  If I read a book, it’s the same thing.  The newspaper is a source of world ideas; so, for that matter, is the television.  But those are the obvious things.

I could go on vacation, and justify it as a study of other parts of the world.  How much more realistic could my development of a Greco-Roman culture feel if I’ve walked the Appian Way, or stood before the Parthenon?  Could I write as convincing an Asian setting without visiting China and Japan?  If we’re setting this in the mountains in the summer, a trip to the Poconos is helpful, but wouldn’t it be so greatly enhanced by traveling to the Rockies, the Alps, and perhaps the Himalayas?  I can visit the beach and learn much; I can visit Historic Gloucester, legendary Malibu, and even the black beaches of Hawaii and learn so much more. Read more