Month: December 2017

House of Wren (Renewal)

The House of Wren is one focused on reprieve. The world is hard and demanding and this House is here to bolster the weary. Their temples are most often hot springs, beautiful gardens or other environments that are often associated with rest and relaxation. Some temples are quiet and serene while others are loud and boisterous. While fun and games may be part of their mission, they are drawn to the downtrodden and grief stricken. One travels to the House of Holma to mend the flesh, but the House of Wren is where you go to mend the heart and mind.

Granted Power: Once per game session the character may temporarily relieve all stress penalties of everyone within 30ft for 5 minutes per point of SPIRIT

  1. Remove Fear: Suppresses fear or gives +4 on saves against fear for one subject + one per four levels.
  2. Restoration, Lesser: Dispels magical ability penalty or repairs 1d4 ability damage.
  3. Remove Curse: Frees object or person from curse.
  4. Restoration : Restores level and ability score drains.
  5. Atonement : Removes burden of misdeeds from subject.
  6. Break Enchantment: Frees subjects from enchantments, alterations, curses, and petrification.
  7. Restoration, Greater : As restoration, plus restores all levels and ability scores.
  8. Holy Aura: +4 to AC, +4 resistance, and SR 25 against evil spells.
  9. Refuge: Alters item to transport its possessor to you. (Given very rarely and only to those traveling to the sealed lands. Travel takes from a blink of an eye up to one week and can be by various means but all are dramatic but unstoppable)

Faith in Play #1: Reintroduction

This is Faith in Play #1: Reintroduction, for December 2017.


There is a sense in which this is the continuation of the Faith and Gaming series. I began writing that in April, 2001, and continued doing so every month for four years—and then stopped. It seemed to end abruptly to me, but as I looked back at it the final installment was an excellent last article, and it has stood the test of time as such, as the series was published first independently by me and then in an expanded book by Blackwyrm. The end seemed abrupt to me because it was occasioned by a computer crash at my end that took all my notes for future series articles (it ended the Game Ideas Unlimited series at Gaming Outpost as well), and at the time I could not see how to get back up to speed. However, it has been more than a decade—thirteen years this past April—since the series ended, and I am often asked, and often consider for myself, whether I am going to continue it. Part of my answer has always been a question: what remains for me to write? Yet there is always more to write; I just have to identify it and tackle it.

And thus there is another sense in which this is a new series—thus the new name, Faith in Play. Part of that is because I noticed from the vantage of years of hindsight that much that I had been writing specifically about role playing games applied much more broadly to all of life, and especially to all of our leisure activities. So with that in mind, I am again putting the fingers to the keys and producing more thoughts on how we integrate faith with life, and particularly with those parts of life that in some sense seem the least religious, the times when we are playing. C. S. Lewis more than once cited a conversation from Pride and Prejudice in which Mr. Bingley was explaining a ball, that is, a festival dance, to Miss Bingley, who had never attended one. Miss Bingley asked, “Would not conversation be much more rational than dancing?”, and Mr. Bingley replies, “Much more rational, but much less like a ball.” And that is the challenge we often face in our leisure activities: that they are what they are, not the least bit rational, and yet not for that reason unimportant. In some ways, how we spend our leisure time, what we do when we are having fun or relaxing, may be the most important part of our Christianity, because it is the one thing over which we have the most control, the one part of our lives in which we most express who and what we are, and usually the time when we are interacting with others most naturally.

This is not the first time I have begun a new series of articles, and I generally begin with an introductory post. That post usually explains what it is I hope to write, and who I am that I feel qualified to write any such thing. Having explained the former, that leaves me with the awkward part of presenting my credentials. Read more