Month: November 2017

House of Holma (Healing)

The House of Holma is the branch tasked with healing. Despite what would be expected, Holma is one of the most highly criticized Houses. Naturally, their abilities are in high demand which has often made them the targets of extortion, kidnapping and bribery. Due to those realities they are secretive and mostly nomadic. Their own temples are unmarked, located in difficult to reach areas or out of sight in dark alleys. These serve as reprieves and safe houses for them. Everywhere they go they are in high demand if their GIFT is discovered. Instead, they work with the other Houses and travel to where they are needed for a few days before moving onto the next.

GM Note: Holma is intended to be a difficult House to play. If the PC’s identity is discovered they will be pursued. Sometimes the need is legitimate and sometimes it is born out of greed. The player should feel cautious any time they reveal their GIFT

Granted Power: Once per game session the character can use any talent they have without fuel or tokens.

  1. Cure Light Wounds: Cures 1d8 damage +1/level (max +5).
  2. Neutralize Poison: Immunizes subject against poison, detoxifies venom in or on subject.
  3. Cure Moderate Wounds: Cures 2d8 damage +1/level (max +10).
  4. Remove Blindness/Deafness: Cures normal or magical conditions.
  5. Cure Serious Wounds: Cures 3d8 damage +1/level (max +15).
  6. Remove Disease: Cures all diseases affecting subject.
  7. Cure Light Wounds, Mass: Cures 1d8 damage +1/level (max +25) for many creatures.
  8. Heal: Cures 10 points/level of damage, all diseases and mental conditions.
  9. Regenerate: Subject’s severed limbs grow back, cures 4d8 damage +1/level (max +35).

Faith and Gaming: Samaritan

“The Good Samaritan”. Balthasar van Cortbemde, 1647

I pondered what to write in this month’s column. Normally I’m not much for noting special events, but this column marks the conclusion of four years during which a new subject has been addressed each month, relating our faith to our gaming, exploring how we can make our game play specifically Christian. The hope is that such a milestone would be marked by one of the better entries in the series. It’s difficult to know, however, which articles will prove themselves particularly helpful until the responses start appearing, so there’s not much sense in focusing too much effort on that decision. Noting that this is about playing games that are peculiarly Christian, I realized I had a topic note that spoke of a specifically Christian story one might tell in a game.

Of course, it might be presumptive to begin by stating that it is a particularly Christian story. That would seem to be the first question. We have twice before examined stories that might be specifically Christian in their essence. In Deals it was the Faust story, the story of the man who sold his soul to the devil and didn’t really get what he wanted from it. In Goethe’s hands that was a very Christian story; the question is whether it would be so in the hands of the average role player. We also considered the Redemption story—not the Redemption Story, the story of Christ’s sacrifice for us, but the more personal story of the Prodigal, God’s effort to redeem us individually. It may be that this is a specifically Christian story; on the other hand, it appears in pop culture expressed by those who have no known commitment to our faith, so if it is a specifically Christian story it may have lost much of its impact in our post-Christian world. Read more