House of Wren (Renewal)

The House of Wren is one focused on reprieve. The world is hard and demanding and this House is here to bolster the weary. Their temples are most often hot springs, beautiful gardens or other environments that are often associated with rest and relaxation. Some temples are quiet and serene while others are loud and boisterous. While fun and games may be part of their mission, they are drawn to the downtrodden and grief stricken. One travels to the House of Holma to mend the flesh, but the House of Wren is where you go to mend the heart and mind.

Granted Power: Once per game session the character may temporarily relieve all stress penalties of everyone within 30ft for 5 minutes per point of SPIRIT

  1. Remove Fear: Suppresses fear or gives +4 on saves against fear for one subject + one per four levels.
  2. Restoration, Lesser: Dispels magical ability penalty or repairs 1d4 ability damage.
  3. Remove Curse: Frees object or person from curse.
  4. Restoration : Restores level and ability score drains.
  5. Atonement : Removes burden of misdeeds from subject.
  6. Break Enchantment: Frees subjects from enchantments, alterations, curses, and petrification.
  7. Restoration, Greater : As restoration, plus restores all levels and ability scores.
  8. Holy Aura: +4 to AC, +4 resistance, and SR 25 against evil spells.
  9. Refuge: Alters item to transport its possessor to you. (Given very rarely and only to those traveling to the sealed lands. Travel takes from a blink of an eye up to one week and can be by various means but all are dramatic but unstoppable)

Faith in Play #1: Reintroduction

This is Faith in Play #1: Reintroduction, for December 2017.


There is a sense in which this is the continuation of the Faith and Gaming series. I began writing that in April, 2001, and continued doing so every month for four years—and then stopped. It seemed to end abruptly to me, but as I looked back at it the final installment was an excellent last article, and it has stood the test of time as such, as the series was published first independently by me and then in an expanded book by Blackwyrm. The end seemed abrupt to me because it was occasioned by a computer crash at my end that took all my notes for future series articles (it ended the Game Ideas Unlimited series at Gaming Outpost as well), and at the time I could not see how to get back up to speed. However, it has been more than a decade—thirteen years this past April—since the series ended, and I am often asked, and often consider for myself, whether I am going to continue it. Part of my answer has always been a question: what remains for me to write? Yet there is always more to write; I just have to identify it and tackle it.

And thus there is another sense in which this is a new series—thus the new name, Faith in Play. Part of that is because I noticed from the vantage of years of hindsight that much that I had been writing specifically about role playing games applied much more broadly to all of life, and especially to all of our leisure activities. So with that in mind, I am again putting the fingers to the keys and producing more thoughts on how we integrate faith with life, and particularly with those parts of life that in some sense seem the least religious, the times when we are playing. C. S. Lewis more than once cited a conversation from Pride and Prejudice in which Mr. Bingley was explaining a ball, that is, a festival dance, to Miss Bingley, who had never attended one. Miss Bingley asked, “Would not conversation be much more rational than dancing?”, and Mr. Bingley replies, “Much more rational, but much less like a ball.” And that is the challenge we often face in our leisure activities: that they are what they are, not the least bit rational, and yet not for that reason unimportant. In some ways, how we spend our leisure time, what we do when we are having fun or relaxing, may be the most important part of our Christianity, because it is the one thing over which we have the most control, the one part of our lives in which we most express who and what we are, and usually the time when we are interacting with others most naturally.

This is not the first time I have begun a new series of articles, and I generally begin with an introductory post. That post usually explains what it is I hope to write, and who I am that I feel qualified to write any such thing. Having explained the former, that leaves me with the awkward part of presenting my credentials. Read more

Overview of the Articles on the New Christian Gamers Guild Website

Over the past eighteen months, our diligent and dedicated webmaster Bryan has been republishing much of the material generated by and for the Christian Gamers Guild over the previous two decades in a new web format which is thought to be more accessible and is certainly better looking.  That has included material from our e-zine The Way, the Truth, and the Dice, a couple of articles from elsewhere, some new material, and of course my own Faith and Gaming series.  The upside of this is that many readers have discovered these articles for the first time.  The downside, from my perspective, is that it became just a bit tougher for me to refer people to the articles—not individually, but as a collection.  The old site had a single “Chaplain’s Corner” index that described and linked the entire series plus quite a few other articles on and off the site, and when people had questions about role playing or other hobby games I could (in addition to addressing the specific questions) refer them to that page for more information than they perhaps would have wanted.  That page still has some valuable links, but Bryan agreed with me that now that the entire series has been relocated there ought to be a page that indexes it all at the new locations.

Several thoughts occurred to me as I undertook this.  One was that there were a few articles I wrote which are excellent pieces not originally part of the Faith and Gaming series, and they should be included here.  The second was that it would seem particularly arrogant of me to index my own contributions and ignore those excellent articles by everyone else, so I am going to attempt in essence to map the entire site—not in the old directory tree mapping style, but in something more useful. Read more

Faith and Gaming: Miscarriage

Therefore do not let what is for you a good thing be spoken of as evil.

These words of the Apostle Paul in Romans 14:16 are cause enough for us to tell the world that role playing games such as Dungeons & Dragons™ are a good thing which Christians can and perhaps should embrace, enjoy, and use to the glory of God, and to answer the calumnious misinformation spread by others. Yet the question is still asked why it matters if fantasy role playing games are wrongly accused of being evil. What harm is there in this mistake? Shouldn’t we be taking our stand on more important issues, and just letting the people who fear and condemn role playing games live with their error? It isn’t that important, is it? It won’t really make a difference in anyone’s life if a few pin-headed Christians are confused on a matter of a silly game and no one bothers to put things right, will it? Read more

House of Holma (Healing)

The House of Holma is the branch tasked with healing. Despite what would be expected, Holma is one of the most highly criticized Houses. Naturally, their abilities are in high demand which has often made them the targets of extortion, kidnapping and bribery. Due to those realities they are secretive and mostly nomadic. Their own temples are unmarked, located in difficult to reach areas or out of sight in dark alleys. These serve as reprieves and safe houses for them. Everywhere they go they are in high demand if their GIFT is discovered. Instead, they work with the other Houses and travel to where they are needed for a few days before moving onto the next.

GM Note: Holma is intended to be a difficult House to play. If the PC’s identity is discovered they will be pursued. Sometimes the need is legitimate and sometimes it is born out of greed. The player should feel cautious any time they reveal their GIFT

Granted Power: Once per game session the character can use any talent they have without fuel or tokens.

  1. Cure Light Wounds: Cures 1d8 damage +1/level (max +5).
  2. Neutralize Poison: Immunizes subject against poison, detoxifies venom in or on subject.
  3. Cure Moderate Wounds: Cures 2d8 damage +1/level (max +10).
  4. Remove Blindness/Deafness: Cures normal or magical conditions.
  5. Cure Serious Wounds: Cures 3d8 damage +1/level (max +15).
  6. Remove Disease: Cures all diseases affecting subject.
  7. Cure Light Wounds, Mass: Cures 1d8 damage +1/level (max +25) for many creatures.
  8. Heal: Cures 10 points/level of damage, all diseases and mental conditions.
  9. Regenerate: Subject’s severed limbs grow back, cures 4d8 damage +1/level (max +35).

Faith and Gaming: Samaritan

“The Good Samaritan”. Balthasar van Cortbemde, 1647

I pondered what to write in this month’s column. Normally I’m not much for noting special events, but this column marks the conclusion of four years during which a new subject has been addressed each month, relating our faith to our gaming, exploring how we can make our game play specifically Christian. The hope is that such a milestone would be marked by one of the better entries in the series. It’s difficult to know, however, which articles will prove themselves particularly helpful until the responses start appearing, so there’s not much sense in focusing too much effort on that decision. Noting that this is about playing games that are peculiarly Christian, I realized I had a topic note that spoke of a specifically Christian story one might tell in a game.

Of course, it might be presumptive to begin by stating that it is a particularly Christian story. That would seem to be the first question. We have twice before examined stories that might be specifically Christian in their essence. In Deals it was the Faust story, the story of the man who sold his soul to the devil and didn’t really get what he wanted from it. In Goethe’s hands that was a very Christian story; the question is whether it would be so in the hands of the average role player. We also considered the Redemption story—not the Redemption Story, the story of Christ’s sacrifice for us, but the more personal story of the Prodigal, God’s effort to redeem us individually. It may be that this is a specifically Christian story; on the other hand, it appears in pop culture expressed by those who have no known commitment to our faith, so if it is a specifically Christian story it may have lost much of its impact in our post-Christian world. Read more

The Whip of Andrei Korsky

The Editor noticed that a certain magical whip has been instrumental in several battles during Mike’s Isenwald campaign, so I asked him to give us a write-up of the whip and its origin. He couldn’t remember much of the details about the session, but he did have this character profile for Andrei Korsky, which includes a description and stats for the whip. Enjoy!

—Bryan


Andrei “the Scourge” Korsky, Yepiskop’s Henchman

The Yepiskop of Ariangrad has numerous agents to do his bidding, but Andrei Korsky is one of his most brutal deputies. Though the Yepiskop ultimately trusts no one, he trusted Andrei enough to bestow upon him a special gift—an enchanted knout. (A knout is a whip designed specifically for punishment.) He wields this in battle with good effect, enough to earn him the nickname “the Scourge”. He has killed more than one man with a single blow of the knout. Read more

Faith and Gaming: Teleology

God of our fathers, Whose almighty hand
Leads forth in beauty all the starry band
Of shining worlds in splendor through the skies
Our grateful songs before Thy throne arise.

There’s an old joke about a comedians convention at which those in attendance didn’t bother to tell any jokes in their speeches, but rather referred to the jokes by number so everyone could think of the joke and laugh, and the speaker could get on with his speech. In much the same way, people who discuss philosophy and theology have given labels to a handful of ideas which attempt to prove that God exists. One of those, the one in which we are interested at the moment, is called the teleological argument for the existence of God. It’s an argument you’ve surely heard, but might not know by that name. Teleology is about design.

In the classic formation of the argument presented by William Paley in his Evidences of the Christian Religion, it is predicated that the existence of a watch demands the existence of a watchmaker. From this it is then argued that the universe has the marks of a designer, the act of an intelligence who or which put it all together. Hence there must be a god (not necessarily the Christian God, but at least a creative intelligence) responsible for the construction of the world. Read more

House of Ascen (Good)

Guild member R.C. Brooks returns with more Lands in the Clouds, a home-brewed OGL setting and system.


The House of Ascen, or simply Ascen, is the sect devoted to that which is good. More specifically, good is that which edifies. It heals the soul. In the world they are often the shelter for those dealing with grief and loss. Mechanically they are the House that deals with SPIRIT damage and combating evil entities. The House of Holma may heal the body, but SPIRIT wounds are more dangerous and can fester.

Typical temples are humble buildings often in poor or otherwise troubled areas as that is where they are needed most. Almost all carry low level tokens.

Once per game session, a character of the House of Ascen may use his SPIRIT score as an attack, defense or damage reduction vs SPIRIT opponents/damage.

Ascen Tokens:

  1. Protection from Evil: +2 to AC and saves, counter mind control, hedge out elementals and outsiders.
  2. Aid: +1 on attack rolls, +1 on saves against fear, 1d8 temporary SPIRIT +1/level (max +10).
  3. Shelter (Magic Circle against Evil): As Protection from Evil, but 10-ft. radius and 10 min./level.
  4. Holy Smite: Damages and blinds evil creatures.
  5. Dispel Evil: +4 bonus against attacks by evil creatures.
  6. Heroes’ Feast: Food for one creature/level cures and grants combat bonuses.
  7. Holy Word: Kills, paralyzes, slows, or deafens non-good subjects.
  8. Holy Aura: +4 to AC, +4 resistance, and SR 25 against evil spells.
  9. Grace: Removes all STRESS points for any willing up to 1 character/lvl in the House.

Faith and Gaming: Heavens

The heavens are telling the glory of God; the wonder of his works displays the firmament.

I grew up to that, to some degree. It’s the words to perhaps the most familiar selection from Haydn’s oratorio, The Creation, and it was sung by church choirs before I was in them and when I was in them. I had the opportunity to sing most of the rest of the larger work in high school, but this is the piece I remember. It tells us that the stars, the sky, the heavenly bodies, are all joined in announcing God’s greatness.

Last month we pondered whether Animals knew something we didn’t know. This month we move from the non-sentient to the inanimate. Do the stars declare the glory of God? Read more